Association Between Maternal Alcohol Consumption in Early Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes

A high level of alcohol consumption in pregnancy has been reported by this international birth study led by researchers in Cork, who found Ireland had the highest proportion of drinking during pregnancy. The study found 80 per cent of women in Ireland drank at some point in their pregnancy compared to 65 per cent in the UK, 38 per cent in Australia and 53 per cent in New Zealand. A follow-up study will look at the situation in other European countries. 80 per cent of the 1,774 women recruited to the Irish part of the study had consumed some alcohol in the first 15 weeks of pregnancy. More than 20 per cent reported drinking moderate to heavy amounts of alcohol at 15 weeks of pregnancy, while 31 per cent of women in Ireland admitted to two or more episodes of binge drinking in the first 15 weeks
September 17, 2013 - 227.7 KiB

Behavioural change in relation to alcohol exposure in early pregnancy and impact on perinatal outcomes - a prospective cohort study

A detailed history of alcohol consumption pre-pregnancy and during early pregnancy was recorded at the first antenatal visit with follow-up of the mother and infant until discharge following birth. Adverse perinatal outcomes were compared for ‘non-drinkers’, ‘ex-drinkers’ and ‘current drinkers’.
February 21, 2013 - 197.1 KiB

The Coombe Women’s Hospital Study of Alcohol, Smoking and Illicit Drug Use 1987-2005 (2007)

The Coombe Women’s Hospital Study of Alcohol, Smoking and Illicit Drug Use 1987-2005 (2007) found that almost two-thirds (63%) of the 43,318 women surveyed said they drank alcohol during their pregnancy.
February 11, 2013 - 504.4 KiB