Working to reduce alcohol harm

The Public Health (Alcohol) Bill will save lives, reduce harms, alleviate public services and release scarce public funds for greater socio-economic benefit.

The Public Health (Alcohol) Bill is a progressive piece of legislation designed to significantly and positively alter Ireland’s harmful relationship with alcohol. It will ensure that alcohol misuse is treated as a serious public health problem. The legislation is part of a wider range of reasonable and pragmatic measures under the strategic framework of Healthy Ireland, which aims to improve the nation’s health and wellbeing. It will seek to reduce our per capita consumption from 11.46 litres in 2016 to... Full Story


Ireland’s per capita alcohol consumption increased in 2016

Alcohol consumption in Ireland increased during 2016, according to provisional figures released by the Revenue Commissioners. The figures show that per capita alcohol consumption was 11.46 litres of pure alcohol per person aged 15+ in 2016, an increase of 4.8% from 2015, when it was 10.93 litres. There were increases recorded in all categories of alcohol: spirits (+8.9%), cider (+8.5%), wine (+6.2%), and beer (+3.7%). Alcohol Action Ireland is calling on the Government to implement the Public Health (Alcohol) Bill... Full Story


Alcohol’s cost to society

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has pointed out that, beyond health consequences, the harmful use of alcohol brings significant social and economic losses to individuals and society at large.[i] In Ireland, the burden of alcohol related harm is often experienced by those around the drinker, such as a family member, friend, co-worker or innocent bystander.  Alcohol’s harm to others undermines public safety and is experienced in every community, ranging from the nuisance factor, feeling unsafe in public places, drink-driving, to... Full Story


Alcohol harm and health inequalities

Lower socioeconomic groups generally consume less alcohol overall and contain a higher proportion of abstainers, but they experience higher levels of alcohol harm than wealthier groups in society with the same level of consumption.[i] This is often referred to as the ‘Alcohol Harm Paradox’.[ii][iii] The ‘Alcohol Harm Paradox’ is evident in Ireland, where the Department of Health has stated that, while alcohol harm affects all social groups in Ireland, ‘the greater harm is experienced by marginalised and deprived groups’.[iv] The... Full Story


Tourism and excise duty

Excise duty has been regularly described as ‘a tax on tourism’ by alcohol industry lobbyists in Ireland, who claim that it damages our tourism offering. There is no evidence to substantiate this claim, as the number of tourists visiting Ireland the amount of money spent by tourists in Ireland grows year-on-year. Figures released by Fáilte Ireland in July 2016 show that expenditure by tourists visiting Ireland was estimated to be worth €6 billion in 2015, which represents annual growth of... Full Story


Healthy Ireland

Alcohol consumption is a key contributory risk-factor to Ireland’s burden of chronic disease, along with lifestyle factors such as smoking, poor diet and lack of physical activity. Healthy Ireland: A Framework for Improved Health and Wellbeing 2013 – 2025, states that ‘a healthy population is essential to allow people to live their lives to their full potential, to create the right environment to sustain jobs, to help restore the economy and to look after the most vulnerable people in society’.[i]... Full Story


Alcohol and health

The harmful use of alcohol is a causal factor in more than 200 disease and injury conditions. Worldwide, 3.3 million deaths every year result from harmful use of alcohol, which represents 5.9% of all deaths.[i] Harmful alcohol use is the fifth leading cause of death and disability worldwide, up from 8th in 1990, and every 10 seconds somebody dies from a problem related to alcohol and many more develop an alcohol-related disease.[ii] Alcohol is associated with a risk of developing... Full Story


Making the healthy choice an easier one will not turn Ireland into a Nanny State

People looking at the recently published Nanny State Index would do well to ask who really has their best interests at heart before accepting that Ireland is one of 'the worst places in the European Union to eat, drink, smoke and vape'. This index has been compiled by free-market lobby groups, the Institute of Economic Affairs and the European Policy Information Centre. If it is to be taken seriously, one first has to accept that all regulations governing food, alcohol... Full Story


We need to protect young people from drink culture

A CHILD’S birthday party that spiralled out of control due to the actions of a number of drunk teenagers made for quite a cautionary tale in a recent edition of the Dublin People. We should be striving to give children every opportunity we can, including the opportunity to have fun and enjoy their formative years. However, we also have a duty of care to ensure that children have the opportunity to fulfill their potential, and to be healthy, happy, and... Full Story


Per capita alcohol consumption in Ireland in 2015 was 10.93 litres of pure alcohol per person aged 15+

OUR current level of alcohol consumption, based on 2015 figures, is 10.93 litres of pure alcohol per person aged 15+, which is a slight, but welcome reduction from 11 litres in 2014. The Irish population increased slightly (0.3%) from 2014 to 2015, but there were was a 4.6% reduction in the population of the relatively heavy drinking 20 to 29-year-old age group between 2014 and 2015, according to CSO... Full Story


Latest Reports

HBSC Ireland 2014 : Alcohol and cannabis use in school-children in Ireland (updated)

The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study is a cross-national research study conducted in collaboration with the World Health Organisation (WHO) Regional Office for Europe and runs on a four-year cycle. In 2014, Ireland participated for the fifth time in the HBSC study (www.nuigalway.ie/hbsc). The study included 13,611 school-children from 3rd class in primary school to 5th year in post-primary school. Collectively, 230 primary and post-primary schools across Ireland participated in this study.

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A review of 2014 RTC fatalities with a positive toxicology for alcohol

The preliminary findings of this report, which examined the toxicology reports of those killed in road crashes in 2014, has revealed that 31% of people killed had alcohol in their system at the time of their deaths.

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Cancer Prevention Factsheet

A factsheet from the National Cancer Control Programme on alcohol and cancer.

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