Alcohol Advertising And Sponsorship In Formula One: A Dangerous Cocktail

A new report which presents data on the extent of alcohol advertising during the 2014 Formula One (F1) Monaco Grand Prix together with an analysis of F1 teams’ sponsorship by the alcohol industry was issued today by the European Alcohol Policy Alliance (Eurocare), Institute of… Full Story»

“Ireland has a serious problem – we drink too much overall and binge drink a lot” – Minister for Health, Leo Varadkar

Seanad Statement Alcohol Awareness and related issues Minister for Health – Leo Varadkar, T.D. 12th May 2015 Introduction I would like to thank the House for raising this issue and giving me the opportunity to discuss it. Alcohol Misuse Ireland has a serious problem –… Full Story»

‘Girls, Women and Alcohol’: The Speakers’ Presentations

Girls, Women and Alcohol: The changing nature of female alcohol consumption in Ireland took place on Tuesday, April 21, 2015, at the Westin Hotel, Dublin 2. This conference saw international and Irish speakers examine the factors influencing the changing culture of drinking among Irish girls… Full Story»

Public health information must be evidence-based and not connected to the alcohol industry to be credible

The HSE today (Thursday April 23rd 2015) announced its new policy on alcohol-related education and communications programmes, which formally separates HSE public health advice from partnership with the alcohol industry. The HSE will be working with the recently formed Alcohol Health Alliance, joining the Royal College… Full Story»

Conference Programme: ‘Girls, Women and Alcohol’

Girls, Women and Alcohol: The changing nature of female alcohol consumption in Ireland takes place on Tuesday, April 21, 2015, at the Westin Hotel, Dublin 2, from 10.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. This conference will see international and Irish speakers examine the factors influencing the changing… Full Story»

Conference Programme

Girls, Women and Alcohol: The changing nature of female alcohol consumption in Ireland
April 20, 2015 - 669.9 KiB

Pre Budget Submission Summary

A two-page summary of the key points from Alcohol Action Ireland's Pre-Budget Submission 2015.
September 3, 2014 - 332.8 KiB

Pre Budget Submission 2015

Alcohol Action Ireland's Pre-Budget Submission 2015.
September 3, 2014 - 331.0 KiB

Submission to the "Working Group on Regulating Sponsorship by Alcohol Companies of Major Sporting Events"

Alcohol Action Ireland's submission to the "Working Group on Regulating Sponsorship by Alcohol Companies of Major Sporting Events". This submission sets out the issues surrounding alcohol sponsorship of sport in Ireland and why implementing a ban will be a key part of any plan to reduce alcohol-related harm.
June 18, 2014 - 4.9 MiB

Alcohol & Pregnancy Leaflet

It is in a child’s best interests for a prospective mother not to drink alcohol while pregnant, due to the risk of damaging the physical and mental development of the unborn child – damage which can have serious, life-long consequences.
March 28, 2014 - 335.1 KiB

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Model-based appraisal of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in the Republic of Ireland

In 2013, the Department of Health, in conjunction with Northern Ireland, commissioned the Sheffield Alcohol Research Group (SARG) at the University of Sheffield to conduct a health impact assessment as part of the process of developing a legislative basis for minimum unit pricing. The health impact assessment studied the impact of different minimum prices on a range of areas such as health, crime and likely economic impact. It also compared minimum unit pricing to other pricing policies.
March 11, 2015 - 2.7 MiB

General Scheme of the Public Health Alcohol Bill 2015

The General Scheme of the Public Health Alcohol Bill 2015, published by the Department of Health in February 2015.
February 10, 2015 - 241.8 KiB

Creating Customers - Finding new ways and places to sell alcohol, and new people to buy it

“Creating Customers" looks at the many ways alcohol producers find new ways and places to sell alcohol, and new people to sell it to – in the UK and around the world.

The report examines how alcohol is marketed to women (both as a calorie-laden indulgence and as an aid to weight loss), and to particular ethnic groups; and how big drinks companies are working to drive up consumption in parts of Africa, Asia and Latin America where levels of drinking have traditionally been low. It also highlights how the industry undermines it own pledges to encourage the safe use of alcohol.

Whilst recognising that alcohol is a legitimate product, the report argues that the drinks industry’s business imperative to sell more alcohol means it is not well placed to advise us how to use it safely and healthily. It includes a series of recommendations for effective regulation of the alcohol industry and its marketing campaigns, and for ending the industry’s involvement formulating public policy and information on safe drinking.
December 17, 2014 - 1.8 MiB

Model - based appraisal of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in Northern Ireland

Estimates from the Northern Ireland (NI) adaptation of the Sheffield Alcohol Policy Model-version 3 (SAPM3) suggest: Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) policies would be effective in reducing alcohol consumption, alcohol related harms (including alcohol-related deaths, hospitalisations, crimes and workplace absences) and the costs associated with those harms.
December 3, 2014 - 2.7 MiB

Impact of minimum price per unit of alcohol on patients with liver disease in UK

A study of liver patients by the University of Southampton shows that a Minimum Unit Price (MUP) policy for alcohol is exquisitely targeted towards the heaviest drinkers with cirrhosis. Published today in Clinical Medicine, the peer review journal for the Royal College of Physicians, the researchers studied the amount and type of alcohol drunk by 404 liver patients, and also asked patients how much they paid for alcohol. They found that patients with alcohol related cirrhosis were drinking on average the equivalent of four bottles of vodka each week, and were buying the cheapest booze they could find, paying around 33p per unit, irrespective of their income. In contrast low risk moderate drinkers were paying on average £1.10 per unit. If the UK government set a MUP at 50p, it wouldn’t affect pubs or bars and would have no impact on moderate drinkers; the average cost would be £4 per year and 90% would not be affected at all. The impact on heavy drinking liver patients would be at least 200 times higher.
August 5, 2014 - 312.1 KiB

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