Tue 22 May

Opinion Piece: Why we must regulate the labelling of alcohol products.

In recent weeks there has been a sustained undermining of the Government’s proposed Public Health Alcohol Bill, and specifically, the measures to regulate the labelling of alcohol products to include nutritional and health warning information. Much of this negative comment...


Wed 09 May

Alcohol Action Ireland rejects ABFI’s assessment of the EU Commission’s Comments on the Public Health Alcohol Bill.

In response to the recent comments from the Alcohol Beverage Federation of Ireland (ABFI: 7th May), Alcohol Action Ireland have refuted the assertion that the EU Commission has stated that Ireland’s proposed measures, as outlined in the Public Health Alcohol...


Tue 01 May

Scottish introduction of Minimum Unit Pricing will save lives

Scottish introduction of Minimum Unit Pricing will save lives  Alcohol Action Ireland today (1st May) welcomed the introduction of Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) on alcohol in Scotland. This comes after what has been an incredible, six-year battle against ‘big alcohol’...

Alcohol in Ireland, Tackling the Financial Hangover: Pre Budget Submission 2011

The case for minimum pricing details how alcohol-related damage is costing each Irish taxpayer €3,318 a year in alcohol-related health and crime costs and puts forward evidence-based policy solutions that will help reduce the levels of alcohol-related harm in the country.

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Have We Bottled It? Survey

Alcohol Action Ireland’s 2010 Have We Bottled It? Alcohol Marketing and Young People survey reveals that young people are being exposed to alcohol brands from a young age. Among 16 to 21-year-olds, alcohol ads represented five out of their top ten favourite ads.

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Keeping It In The Family Survey

Alcohol Action Ireland commissioned Behaviour and Attitudes to conduct market research to gauge the prevalence of, and attitudes to, parental drinking amongst 18 to 40-year-olds

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An Empirical Evaluation of the US Beer Institute’s Self-Regulation Code Governing the Content of Beer Advertising

In an evaluation of beer advertising code regulations aimed to encourage responsible advertising practices, new research from the American Journal of Public Health finds that content violations still occur and the current U.S. Beer Institute’s self-regulation process may be ineffective. Researchers reviewed all alcohol advertisements that aired during the men’s and women’s NCAA basketball tournament games from 1999 to 2008. Current alcohol advertising is self-regulated by the alcohol industry in which the U.S. Beer Institute develops, updates and enforces the regulation codes. This study employed academic and public health professionals to rate the ads using both the 1997 and 2006 versions of the U.S. Beer Institute’s guidelines.

Results showed that when experts reviewed the advertisements, code violations were prevalent. Between 35 percent and 74 percent of the ads had violations, depending on the version of regulation codes used and the scoring method applied. Furthermore, ads with content violations were broadcast more often than those without. Ads that violated the codes most often included content that appealed to young people and content in which beer drinking was associated with social success and sexual attractiveness.

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Eat, drink and gamble: marketing messages about 'risky' products in an Australian major sporting series

The authors, based at different universities in Australia, undertook this study to investigate the alcohol, gambling, and unhealthy food marketing strategies during a nationally televised, free to air, sporting series in Australia. A content analysis of one of Australia’s premier sport event, the 2012 State of Origin three-game series of rugby, identified 4.062 instances of alcohol marketing in 360 minutes of televised coverage. On average each of the three games included 1.353 instances of alcohol marketing, amounting to 66.29 minutes per game.
This study concludes that sport is increasingly used as “a vehicle for the promotion of range of 'risky consumption' products”. They argue that their study raises important ethical and health policy questions about the extent and impact of saturation and incidental marketing strategies on health and wellbeing, the transparency of embedded marketing strategies, and how these strategies may influence product consumption.

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Focus On Alcohol Misuse Among Older People

Many public health campaigns on the misuse of alcohol are aimed at younger age groups. However, there is evidence that alcohol misuse is increasing in people over the age of 65. For a variety of reasons, alcohol misuse among these older people may go unnoticed.
In the Republic of Ireland (ROI), alcohol consumption among the over 65s is lower than other age groups, and 23% of that age group have never drank. However, 10% of those over 65 are consuming alcohol on four or more days per week, higher than any other age group. While younger people in Northern Ireland (NI) drink more than those in older age groups, 16% of people aged 60-74 exceed the weekly guidelines for sensible drinking.
This edition of the CARDI “Focus on . . .” series looks at alcohol misuse among older people across the island of Ireland and asks if more could be done in policy and social work terms to address the associated health and welfare issues among older age groups.

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