Mon 16 Apr

The extraordinary burden on others from Ireland’s harmful use of alcohol.

New research report highlights an untold story:   the extraordinary burden on others from Ireland’s harmful use of alcohol.    ·         One in two people have been bothered and harassed, felt afraid and unsafe from strangers’ drinking. ·         Two in five people are stressed and threatened, and have experienced familial difficulties, in a blend of psychological and tangible harms, from drinkers...


Fri 13 Apr

Alcohol Action Ireland calls for Ireland’s drinking guidelines to be revised.

Alcohol Action Ireland today urged the Department of Health to initiate a review of Ireland’s current recommended low-risk drinking guidelines in light of the findings from a recently published study in the Lancet, which supports limits for alcohol consumption that...


Tue 13 Mar

We deserve better – reaction to alcohol industry self-regulatory proposal for labelling 

JOINT PRESS STATEMENT  Brussels, Belgium, 12th March 2018  We deserve better – reaction to alcohol industry self-regulatory proposal for labelling  Last year the European Commission provided the alcohol industry with the opportunity to come up with a self-regulatory proposal on...

Public Health (Alcohol) Bill - A Summary

A brief summary of the Public Health (Alcohol) Bill, including what this legislation aims to do, why it is needed, and what measures it contains.

application/pdf 154.5 KiB DOWNLOAD

Alcohol Marketing and Young People's Drinking Behaviour in Ireland

A study carried out by the Health Promotion Research Centre at NUI Galway, commissioned by Alcohol Action Ireland, found that Irish children are exposed to large volumes of alcohol marketing, which increases their likelihood of drinking alcohol and engaging in risky drinking behaviour.

application/pdf 1.3 MiB DOWNLOAD

Alcohol Action Ireland Pre Budget Submission 2016

Alcohol Action Ireland recommends that excise duty on all alcohol products be increased in Budget 2016 so that the price of alcohol is set at a level that reflects its significant health, social, and economic impacts; the wide range of harm its consumption causes to others; the costs borne by the State and, ultimately, the taxpayer. We also recommend the introduction of a social responsibility levy on the alcohol industry, which currently makes no direct contribution to addressing the considerable financial burden the consumption of its products places on the State.

application/pdf 830.8 KiB DOWNLOAD

1 7 8 9 10 11 21

Model - based appraisal of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in Northern Ireland

Estimates from the Northern Ireland (NI) adaptation of the Sheffield Alcohol Policy Model-version 3 (SAPM3) suggest: Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) policies would be effective in reducing alcohol consumption, alcohol related harms (including alcohol-related deaths, hospitalisations, crimes and workplace absences) and the costs associated with those harms.

application/pdf 2.7 MiB DOWNLOAD

Impact of minimum price per unit of alcohol on patients with liver disease in UK

A study of liver patients by the University of Southampton shows that a Minimum Unit Price (MUP) policy for alcohol is exquisitely targeted towards the heaviest drinkers with cirrhosis. Published today in Clinical Medicine, the peer review journal for the Royal College of Physicians, the researchers studied the amount and type of alcohol drunk by 404 liver patients, and also asked patients how much they paid for alcohol. They found that patients with alcohol related cirrhosis were drinking on average the equivalent of four bottles of vodka each week, and were buying the cheapest booze they could find, paying around 33p per unit, irrespective of their income. In contrast low risk moderate drinkers were paying on average £1.10 per unit. If the UK government set a MUP at 50p, it wouldn’t affect pubs or bars and would have no impact on moderate drinkers; the average cost would be £4 per year and 90% would not be affected at all. The impact on heavy drinking liver patients would be at least 200 times higher.

application/pdf 312.1 KiB DOWNLOAD

Irish Alcohol Diaries 2013

Figures published by the Health Research Board confirm that Irish drinking patterns are harmful and almost one in fourteen drinkers meet criteria for dependent drinking. The figures were captured as part of the first National Alcohol Diary Survey involving almost 6,000 people, aged 18-75 years, across Ireland during 2013.

application/pdf 1.3 MiB DOWNLOAD

1 7 8 9 10 11 63