Creating Customers - Finding new ways and places to sell alcohol, and new people to buy it

“Creating Customers" looks at the many ways alcohol producers find new ways and places to sell alcohol, and new people to sell it to – in the UK and around the world.

The report examines how alcohol is marketed to women (both as a calorie-laden indulgence and as an aid to weight loss), and to particular ethnic groups; and how big drinks companies are working to drive up consumption in parts of Africa, Asia and Latin America where levels of drinking have traditionally been low. It also highlights how the industry undermines it own pledges to encourage the safe use of alcohol.

Whilst recognising that alcohol is a legitimate product, the report argues that the drinks industry’s business imperative to sell more alcohol means it is not well placed to advise us how to use it safely and healthily. It includes a series of recommendations for effective regulation of the alcohol industry and its marketing campaigns, and for ending the industry’s involvement formulating public policy and information on safe drinking.
December 17, 2014 - 1.8 MiB

Model - based appraisal of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in Northern Ireland

Estimates from the Northern Ireland (NI) adaptation of the Sheffield Alcohol Policy Model-version 3 (SAPM3) suggest: Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) policies would be effective in reducing alcohol consumption, alcohol related harms (including alcohol-related deaths, hospitalisations, crimes and workplace absences) and the costs associated with those harms.
December 3, 2014 - 2.7 MiB

Impact of minimum price per unit of alcohol on patients with liver disease in UK

A study of liver patients by the University of Southampton shows that a Minimum Unit Price (MUP) policy for alcohol is exquisitely targeted towards the heaviest drinkers with cirrhosis. Published today in Clinical Medicine, the peer review journal for the Royal College of Physicians, the researchers studied the amount and type of alcohol drunk by 404 liver patients, and also asked patients how much they paid for alcohol. They found that patients with alcohol related cirrhosis were drinking on average the equivalent of four bottles of vodka each week, and were buying the cheapest booze they could find, paying around 33p per unit, irrespective of their income. In contrast low risk moderate drinkers were paying on average £1.10 per unit. If the UK government set a MUP at 50p, it wouldn’t affect pubs or bars and would have no impact on moderate drinkers; the average cost would be £4 per year and 90% would not be affected at all. The impact on heavy drinking liver patients would be at least 200 times higher.
August 5, 2014 - 312.1 KiB

Irish Alcohol Diaries 2013

Figures published by the Health Research Board confirm that Irish drinking patterns are harmful and almost one in fourteen drinkers meet criteria for dependent drinking. The figures were captured as part of the first National Alcohol Diary Survey involving almost 6,000 people, aged 18-75 years, across Ireland during 2013.
June 23, 2014 - 1.3 MiB

Country profiles for World Health Organisation Member States - Global status report on alcohol and health 2014.

Country profiles for World Health Organisation Member States from the WHO's Global status report on alcohol and health 2014.
June 1, 2014 - 4.3 MiB

Global status report on alcohol and health 2014

The World Health Organisation's Global status report on alcohol and health 2014 provides a global overview of alcohol consumption in relation to public health (Chapter 1) as well as information on: the consumption of alcohol in populations (Chapter 2); the health consequences of alcohol consumption (Chapter 3); and policy responses at national level (Chapter 4).
June 1, 2014 - 2.3 MiB

Like, Comment, Share - Alcohol brand activity on Facebook

By the end of 2012 the top 20 alcohol brands (brands) in Australia had more than 2.5 million followers on their Facebook pages. During 2012 they posted more than 4500 items of content. Their followers interacted with that content by liking, sharing or commenting on it more than 2.3 million times. These figures suggest that Facebook is now a key player in the promotion of alcohol. The alcohol industry has developed an extensive, real-time, culturally embedded mode of branding on Facebook. The sophisticated use of social media by brands identified in this research raises seven issues that are currently not addressed by existing regulation.
May 2, 2014 - 3.8 MiB

Better Outcomes. Brighter Futures. The national policy framework for children and young people 2014-2020

Through the implementation of this Framework and supporting strategies, the Government aims to achieve a number of 'shifts’ over the 7-year period 2014-2020 to support the achievement of better outcomes for all children and young people: In the Framework the Government recognises the need to address our worrying patterns of alcohol consumption among children and young people in Ireland and to protect those affected by the harmful drinking of others.
April 24, 2014 - 2.0 MiB

KEY FINDINGS: Alcohol's Harm To Others

Key findings from a report, prepared for the HSE by Dr Ann Hope, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Trinity College, Dublin. The report outlines alcohol harm's to others in Ireland, where the burden of alcohol related harm is often experienced by those around the drinker, be they family member, friend, co-worker or innocent ‘bystander’.
April 1, 2014 - 632.1 KiB

Exposure of Children and Adolescents to Alcohol Marketing on Social Media Websites

In 2011, online marketing became the largest marketing channel in the UK, overtaking television for the first time. This study aimed to describe the exposure of children and young adults to alcohol marketing on social media websites in the UK. All five of the alcohol brands studied maintained a Facebook page, Twitter page and YouTube channel, with varying levels of user engagement. Facebook pages could not be accessed by an under-18 user, but in most cases YouTube content and Twitter content could be accessed by those of all ages. The authors concluded that the rise in online marketing of alcohol and the high use of social media websites by young people suggests that this is an area requiring further monitoring and regulation.
March 24, 2014 - 96.4 KiB

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