Model-based appraisal of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in the Republic of Ireland

In 2013, the Department of Health, in conjunction with Northern Ireland, commissioned the Sheffield Alcohol Research Group (SARG) at the University of Sheffield to conduct a health impact assessment as part of the process of developing a legislative basis for minimum unit pricing. The health impact assessment studied the impact of different minimum prices on a range of areas such as health, crime and likely economic impact. It also compared minimum unit pricing to other pricing policies.
March 11, 2015 - 2.7 MiB

Model - based appraisal of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in Northern Ireland

Estimates from the Northern Ireland (NI) adaptation of the Sheffield Alcohol Policy Model-version 3 (SAPM3) suggest: Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) policies would be effective in reducing alcohol consumption, alcohol related harms (including alcohol-related deaths, hospitalisations, crimes and workplace absences) and the costs associated with those harms.
December 3, 2014 - 2.7 MiB

Impact of minimum price per unit of alcohol on patients with liver disease in UK

A study of liver patients by the University of Southampton shows that a Minimum Unit Price (MUP) policy for alcohol is exquisitely targeted towards the heaviest drinkers with cirrhosis. Published today in Clinical Medicine, the peer review journal for the Royal College of Physicians, the researchers studied the amount and type of alcohol drunk by 404 liver patients, and also asked patients how much they paid for alcohol. They found that patients with alcohol related cirrhosis were drinking on average the equivalent of four bottles of vodka each week, and were buying the cheapest booze they could find, paying around 33p per unit, irrespective of their income. In contrast low risk moderate drinkers were paying on average £1.10 per unit. If the UK government set a MUP at 50p, it wouldn’t affect pubs or bars and would have no impact on moderate drinkers; the average cost would be £4 per year and 90% would not be affected at all. The impact on heavy drinking liver patients would be at least 200 times higher.
August 5, 2014 - 312.1 KiB

Minimum Pricing of Alcohol versus Volumetric Taxation: Which Policy Will Reduce Heavy Consumption without Adversely Affecting Light and Moderate Consumers?

A study conducted to estimate the effect on light, moderate and heavy consumers of alcohol from implementing a minimum unit price for alcohol (MUP) compared with a uniform volumetric tax. It found that while both a MUP and a uniform volumetric tax have potential to reduce heavy consumption of wine and beer without adversely affecting light and moderate consumers, a MUP offers the potential to achieve greater reductions in heavy consumption at a lower overall annual cost to consumers.
March 11, 2014 - 317.9 KiB

Effects of minimum unit pricing for alcohol on different income and socioeconomic groups: a modelling study

Several countries are considering a minimum price policy for alcohol, but concerns exist about the potential effects on drinkers with low incomes. The Sheffield Alcohol Research Group aimed to assess the effect of a £0·45 minimum unit price (1 unit is 8 g/10mL ethanol) in England across the income and socioeconomic distributions.
March 11, 2014 - 328.3 KiB

‘The Efficacy of Minimum Unit Pricing, Fiscal and other Pricing Public Policies for Alcohol’

This report was commissioned from CPJ Consultants by the Department of Health. It sets out the issues relating to hazardous and harmful consumption of alcohol in Ireland. It looks at the international experience and policy response and makes recommendations about how the problems caused by hazardous alcohol consumption can and should be tackled in Ireland, with a specific focus on pricing policies.
October 31, 2013 - 1.0 MiB

Alcohol Action Ireland Pre Budget Submission 2014

Alcohol Action Ireland's Pre-Budget Submission 2014 calls for the introduction of minimum pricing. Minimum pricing has the potential to significantly reduce alcohol-related harm in Ireland, resulting in a reduction of the substantial costs incurred by the State and the number of lives lost due to alcohol in Ireland every year. It would effectively target those drinkers choosing the cheapest and strongest alcohol products, who would benefit most from a reduction in their consumption, while having little or no effect on low-risk drinkers. In conjunction with minimum pricing, a very modest "social responsibility" levy on the alcohol industry would make a significant contribution to funding activities and initiatives that would help to reduce the social and health harms caused by its products in Ireland.
September 23, 2013 - 704.6 KiB

RCPI Alcohol Policy Group Pre-Budget Submission 2014

The Royal College of Physicians of Ireland's Alcohol Policy Group bas called for the introduction of minimum pricing and an increase in excise duty in its Pre-Budget Submission 2014.
September 10, 2013 - 543.0 KiB

Examining the impact of a ban on ‘below cost selling’ in the UK

In July 2013, the UK Government announced that it intended to introduce a ban on retailing alcoholic drinks for less than the cost of the duty and VAT payable on the product. Typically referred to as a ban on below cost selling (BBCS). This addendum reports the results of a further appraisal of the new BBCS policy by the University of Sheffiled, as requested by Government, and compares the potential impact of this policy against a 45p minimum unit price.
July 22, 2013 - 507.3 KiB

Modelled income group-specific impacts of alcohol minimum unit pricing in England 2014/15: Policy appraisals using new developments to the Sheffield Alcohol Policy Model (v2.5)

This report was produced at the request of the UK Government to inform consultation and impact assessments around policy options for alcohol pricing arising from the publication of The Government’s Alcohol Strategy in March 2012. Estimates from this new updated version of the Sheffield Alcohol Policy Model (version 2.5) suggest:
1. Minimum unit pricing (MUP) policies would be effective in reducing alcohol consumption, alcohol-related harms (including alcohol-attributable deaths, hospitalisations, crimes and workplace absences) and the costs associated with those harms
2. Moderate drinkers would experience only small impacts from MUP policies. Somewhat larger impacts would be experienced by hazardous drinkers, and the main substantial effects would be experienced amongst harmful drinkers
3. MUP policies would have larger impacts on low income harmful drinkers than higher income harmful drinkers although both would be affected substantially. The impact on low income moderate drinkers would be small in absolute terms
July 22, 2013 - 1.3 MiB

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