Wed 27 May

Any financial support to national sporting bodies must come with a commitment to ending alcohol sponsorship of sport.

Call for Federation of Irish Sport and Sport Ireland to take this ‘once in a generation opportunity’ that can reinforce the benefits of sport and physical activity in our lives, our economy and society as a whole. Alcohol Action Ireland...


Fri 22 May

We have to talk about the trauma to our children

There has been much talk of the issues arising from Covid-19 and the measures we are collectively taking to mitigate its impact. Of particular concern to Alcohol Action Ireland are the likely 200,000 children confined in homes where parental alcohol...


Tue 12 May

AAI | MHI – call for investment in trauma-informed services to support COVID-19 recovery

As a nation, Ireland has shown great resilience and solidarity in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. As we look forward to COVID recovery, our schools, workplaces and communities will need to adjust to the new shape of society and...

Submission to the Advertising Standards Authority for Ireland on The Review of the Code of Standards for Advertising

In Ireland there is no statutory regulation of alcohol marketing, only voluntary codes. The codes themselves do not adequately address digital marketing - one of the most potent channels for target marketing to young people. Alcohol marketing, including advertising, sponsorship and other forms of promotion, increases the likelihood that adolescents will start to use alcohol, and to drink more if they are already using alcohol.

Due to the lack of effective regulations and legislation, young people are poorly protected from these sophisticated and powerful influences on their drinking behaviour and expectations. Alcohol Action Ireland recently made a submission to the Advertising Standards Association of Ireland’s Code review and proposed some practical and realistic measures to help reduce children’s exposure to alcohol marketing, both online and in the mainstream media.

application/pdf 434.8 KiB DOWNLOAD

Public Health (Alcohol) BIll Factsheet

Information on the Government's proposed Public Health (Alcohol) Bill.

application/pdf 373.5 KiB DOWNLOAD

Facing 'The Fear': Alcohol and Mental Health in Ireland

The programme for Alcohol Action Ireland's 2013 Conference, Facing 'The Fear': Alcohol and Mental Health in Ireland.

application/pdf 243.8 KiB DOWNLOAD

1 19 20 21 22 23 29

Examining the impact of a ban on ‘below cost selling’ in the UK

In July 2013, the UK Government announced that it intended to introduce a ban on retailing alcoholic drinks for less than the cost of the duty and VAT payable on the product. Typically referred to as a ban on below cost selling (BBCS). This addendum reports the results of a further appraisal of the new BBCS policy by the University of Sheffiled, as requested by Government, and compares the potential impact of this policy against a 45p minimum unit price.

application/pdf 507.3 KiB DOWNLOAD

Modelled income group-specific impacts of alcohol minimum unit pricing in England 2014/15: Policy appraisals using new developments to the Sheffield Alcohol Policy Model (v2.5)

This report was produced at the request of the UK Government to inform consultation and impact assessments around policy options for alcohol pricing arising from the publication of The Government’s Alcohol Strategy in March 2012. Estimates from this new updated version of the Sheffield Alcohol Policy Model (version 2.5) suggest:
1. Minimum unit pricing (MUP) policies would be effective in reducing alcohol consumption, alcohol-related harms (including alcohol-attributable deaths, hospitalisations, crimes and workplace absences) and the costs associated with those harms
2. Moderate drinkers would experience only small impacts from MUP policies. Somewhat larger impacts would be experienced by hazardous drinkers, and the main substantial effects would be experienced amongst harmful drinkers
3. MUP policies would have larger impacts on low income harmful drinkers than higher income harmful drinkers although both would be affected substantially. The impact on low income moderate drinkers would be small in absolute terms

application/pdf 1.3 MiB DOWNLOAD

On your doorstep - Underage access to alcohol via home delivery services

Underage drinking remains a key concern in Wales. Whilst it is illegal to sell alcohol to persons under 18 years old, in reality, children and young people can and do get hold of alcohol, either via ‘proxy sales’ or directly themselves. Online supermarket grocery services, and latenight and 24 hour alcohol home delivery services, have to date received little attention as a potential source of alcohol for minors. In January and February 2013, an online survey was undertaken, on behalf of Alcohol Concern Cymru, of nearly 1,000 people in Wales aged 14 and 17 years old, to ascertain their usage of such services.

application/pdf 1.4 MiB DOWNLOAD

1 19 20 21 22 23 64