Wed 04 Dec

Alcohol Action Ireland responses to EU scrutiny of draft regulations

Alcohol Action Ireland today published (4 December) its submission to the EU TRIS notification process which is examining the draft regulations from the Department of Health to implement Section 23 (Sale and Supply of Alcohol Products) of the Public Health...


Wed 04 Dec

Aware Lecture: Growing up with parental alcohol misuse: the impact on mental health and things that can help

Silent Voices – an Alcohol Action Ireland initiative to end the silence of the impact of parental alcohol misuse in Ireland is organising a lecture as part of the Aware public lecture series on:   11 Dec 2019, 7.30pm Lecture...


Fri 29 Nov

Alcohol Action proud to be selected for EU Protects campaign

We are delighted to have been selected to feature in the most recent EU Protects campaign created by the European Commission. It provides information on how Europe contributes to the protection of its citizens from the diverse global risks and...

Have We Bottled It? Survey

Alcohol Action Ireland’s 2010 Have We Bottled It? Alcohol Marketing and Young People survey reveals that young people are being exposed to alcohol brands from a young age. Among 16 to 21-year-olds, alcohol ads represented five out of their top ten favourite ads.

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Keeping It In The Family Survey

Alcohol Action Ireland commissioned Behaviour and Attitudes to conduct market research to gauge the prevalence of, and attitudes to, parental drinking amongst 18 to 40-year-olds

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Women & Alcohol: Making The Drink Link

Information and advice about women and alcohol, including tips to help you cut down, is available in Alcohol Action Ireland’s leaflet Women & Alcohol: Making the Drink Link.

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Framing the alcohol policy debate: industry actors and the regulation of the UK beverage alcohol market

This article explores alcohol industry attempts to frame the debate about pricing and promotions policy in the United Kingdom. Framing theory, it is argued, offers us important insights into the dynamics of the policymaking process as a contest between competing conceptualizations of both problems and solutions. Drawing on a documentary analysis and a series of interviews with policymakers, public health advocates and alcohol industry actors, it argues that industry actors framed the policy debate in ways which were consistent with their underlying commercial interests. A clear challenge was posed to the industry by the shift towards whole-population interventions favored by the Scottish government. This led to a reassertion of the industry frame in which alcohol-related harm is limited to a small minority of the population and which advocates targeted interventions.

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Preventing Alcohol Use Disorders Among Children and Adolescents in the EU

A report commissioned by the EU cites research showing the long-term health effects of even moderate drinking among children. "Preventing Alcohol Use Disorders Among Children and Adolescents in the EU" was published by the Working Group on the Quality of Childhood at the European Parliament. The Working Group is a think-tank informing policy makers and other interested parties about current issues concerning childhood and adolescence and offering policy recommendations to EU institutions and member states.

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Youth drinking cultures, social networking and alcohol marketing: implications for public health

Alcohol consumption and heavy drinking in young adults have been key concerns for public health. Alcohol marketing is an important factor in contributing to negative outcomes. The rapid growth in the use of new social networking technologies raises new issues regarding alcohol marketing, as well as potential impacts on alcohol cultures more generally. Young people, for example, routinely tell and re-tell drinking stories online, share images depicting drinking, and are exposed to often intensive and novel forms of alcohol marketing.

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